Shut­ter­stock

Liberal democ­racy has come under pres­sure from various quar­ters: from the outside by author­i­tar­ian regimes, from within by pop­ulist move­ments and parties. This is all the more true of lib­er­al­ism as a school of thought and polit­i­cal prac­tice. Although modern democ­ra­cies are built on this ideal tra­di­tion – from the prin­ci­ples of a liberal polit­i­cal con­sti­tu­tion to the market economy as the eco­nomic foun­da­tion of an open society – lib­er­al­ism has fallen into dis­re­pute in large parts of the public. There are many approaches to a self-crit­i­cal renewal of liberal theory and pol­i­tics, both in Germany and inter­na­tion­ally. However, the cor­re­spond­ing dis­courses usually take place in par­al­lel with each other, without touch­ing and fer­til­iz­ing each other. In this dossier, we want to combine ideas of a new liberalism.

This project is sup­ported by the ZEIT-Stiftung Ebelin und Gerd Bucerius: